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Monthly Archives: August 2018

FLY ‘EM BIG

BIG#1

 

To view a large-scale model in flight is an impressive experience.  These rc planes have a number of features, such as flaps, sliding canopies and landing lights, which convey the impression of a real aircraft.  However, the complexity of these models poses a problem for the rc pilot.  During this blog, we’ll examine some of the problems associated with flying a large rc model.

The first issue of flying a large rc plane is a reliable power source.  While lipo (lithium polymer) batteries now offer near gasoline power in some applications, gasoline engines remain the best choice to provide sustained power over a long flight.  Speaking of fuel, carefully check all fuel lines and make sure they are properly connected.  Make sure you have the correct diameter and type of line for the fuel you are using.  All of the rc’s fuel should be filtered, with periodic filter changes advisable.  A number of models now have a filter in the filing line, as well as one between the carburetor and the fuel tank.  If the rc pilot is using glow fuel or gasoline, he may use either, but not both as they are not interchangeable.  The rc pilot should also make sure the fuel tank clunk stays free from the front of the tank and does not bend, which could obstruct the flow of fuel, producing a rough take off.

Flight control surfaces are an important component, as well.  The rc operator must make sure all control linkages are both properly secured and pivot according to transmitter commands.  Ailerons, elevators, and rudders should have equal parameters of movement in each direction.  This is especially true of flaps, which aid in landing and flight stability at low speeds.  Flap hinges should work freely, without binding.  Servo mounts also pose a problem, as they tend to work loose after repeated flights.  Check them after each flight to ensure they are secure and functioning.  Engine mounts and mufflers are also prone to vibration.  Carefully balancing the props will help, but vibrations are an inherent problem with large rc models.  Replace propeller blades when necessary to keep the aircraft running smoothly, since they cost a fraction of replacing an entire plane.

Range checks are essential to gauge whether a radio signal allows the plane to fly at a safe distance without it going out of radio range.  To conduct a range check, first turn on the transmitter, then the receiver and fully retract the antenna.  Activate the transmitter while walking back from the plane between seventy-five and one-hundred feet.  As you walk away from the plane, keep moving the control surface sticks and closely watch the various control surfaces of the plane.  If you experience a hesitation or a lack of movement of the control surfaces, do not attempt to fly the aircraft.  Check the transmitter batteries, as they may need recharging or replacing, since low batteries may drastically reduce radio range.  Loose connections to the receiver could also cause a lack of response from control surfaces.  If control surfaces are still unresponsive, there may be signal interference from other rc hobbyists on your frequency.  Interference is a leading cause of rc aircraft crashes, so you need to be sure your frequency is clear before taking off.  Whatever the cause, if your rc plane appears difficult to control, correct the problem before flying.

Though not always practiced, test glides of the aircraft are advisable, particularly if the rc model is a powered glider or a large aircraft.  The reason for doing this to determine the glide pattern of the plane, should it suddenly lose power.  A test glide is best conducted over long grass if possible.  This is necessary to ensure a soft landing for the plane should there be turbulence.  Test glides may also be used to confirm the balance of the plane with regard to weight distribution and center of gravity.  Always take off and land in a flat, level area if possible.  Finally, have fun but use common sense; avoid flying too close to people or property yet keeping the plane at a sensible height and distance while maintaining control, as well as keeping an eye out for other rc pilots.

 

BIG#2