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Aviation News

WHERE ARE WE GOING ?

GOI#1

 

If one were to scan the progress of air travel over the past 100 years, they would view a picture of great progress.  Though at times this progress was made at a slow but steady pace, it often grew by leaps and bounds due to advances in both technology and training.  During this blog, we’ll look at several current aviation trends and their impact upon its future.

While the civil aviation industry continues to maintain both profits and growth, it is still sensitive to a number of market drivers.  For example, the world economy is expected to grow at a mid-range pace over the next twenty years.  Oil prices are now approaching the $70 per barrel price range, but they could reach as high as $100 per barrel by 2030.  Many airlines are now adopting a culture based upon financial management, in which the emphasis is on per-passenger profits.  While discount fare and other incentive programs support revenue growth, they create a situation of a high number of passengers at a low profit per passenger.  To remedy this, airlines in the future will invest in a growing number of right-sized aircraft to increase per passenger profit yields.  Over the past three years, per passenger profit yields have decreased by $3 per passenger, while net profit across the airline industry has decreased by 1% over the past two years.  The use of right-sized aircraft will partially reduce the need for sweeping fare discounts in order to fill an aircraft.

In 2016 approximately 80% of all global air routes were composed of regional air traffic.  The regional air route segment is currently experiencing the greatest growth, with increases of five per cent, per year anticipated over the next twenty years.  While these routes generate the greatest per passenger yield, they are mostly served by older aircraft having a 20 to 60 passenger capacity.  As these aircraft are retired, they will need to upgrade both their technology and capacity.  The latest trend in regional air routes is the paired city concept.  Many aircraft servicing these routes have a capacity of 100-150 seats with relatively high per passenger profit yields.  Globally, regional air traffic has increased by twenty per cent over the past two decades and is projected to increase at least that amount over the next twenty years, according a number of air traffic studies.  In China, the government encourages the city-pair concept to stimulate growth in low volume markets, while Russia and Africa have increased city-pair traffic in recent years.  Hubs will become less important as global point-to-point traffic increases.

Along with changes in aircraft, look for changes in the design of airports.  The staffing of airports could shrink due to improvements in technology and safety.  The future trend for airports is one of a travel experience, as opposed to a mere transit point.  They now offer dining, shopping, and a number of activities.  With the current technology of airport processes, passengers now have more leisure time, and this pattern is expected to increase in the future.  With increased passenger traffic, airports will increase in both size and profitability.  In the United States, the FAA mandated Next Gen system, replacing ground-based airspace navigation to a satellite-based system which uses GPS should offer more precise navigation and traffic control at major airports, streamlining air traffic.

A negative factor of air travel in its environmental impact.  Global aviation is responsible for about two per cent of the world’s carbon dioxide emissions-a situation projected to get worse over the coming decades.  While airlines and governments are acting to reduce some of the impact, limited success has been achieved so far.  However, one must realize that fuel represents 30% to 40% of an airlines operating costs, putting airlines in the position of developing more fuel efficient aircraft.  For example, the Boeing 737 MAX series of jetliners have winglets designed to reduce drag and improve fuel efficiency by as much as 2%.  Such a small amount could add up to millions of dollars over the service life of an aircraft.  Attacking the problem from the other end, an increasing number of airlines have begun to use biofuel mixtures in their operations.  Biofuels, which are both more efficient and emit less carbon than fossil fuels, have been phased into service by several major airlines.  United Airlines partnered with the AltAir refinery to provide biofuel to the airline’s hub at Los Angeles, purchasing fifteen million gallons at a 30% blend over a three-year period.  Though not a substantial proportion based upon current airline usage, the United effort holds promise for the future.

Finally, despite the marketing tools of economy airlines and discounted fares, airlines still generate a healthy profit from business and first class passengers.  By offering the soft amenities such as meal service and amenity kits, airlines are able to market their in-flight experience.  To enhance that experience a number of airlines partner with celebrity chefs, such as Daniel Boulud (Air France) to create specialized menus or contract with outside brands, such as TUMI, to provide upscale amenity kits.  This practice will continue to grow, for those who can afford the tickets, the sky is the limit.

AME#1

 

 

 

 

HOW TO STORE THEM

STO#1

 

Ever since the wingspan of rc models exceeded three feet in length, proper storage of flying models has been an issue.  During this blog, we’ll look at several methods of storing radio control planes under different conditions.

For rc modelers who have a large number of aircraft, the best approach is to get them off the floor to prevent damage from a number of sources.  The use of hangers, while not a new idea, will serve to mount the models from the ceiling where they may hang freely out of harm’s way.  The most common hangers are designed smaller aircraft weighing under four pounds.  Heavier models will require larger hangers.  An appropriate hanger size would be a 4′ by 3/16″ steel rod, big enough to reach a ceiling beam as well as strong enough to support the plane.  Bike hooks and smaller scale hooks may also be used to mount the hanger in the ceiling, depending upon the weight and size of the model.  Suggested tools are a ruler, vise, sandblaster or sandpaper, a degreaser, drill, stud finder, and pencil.  Optional tools include 24″ by 3/16″ inside diameter tubing for padding the rod where the wings are supported in addition to glass cleaner or hairspray.

The first step to preparing the hangers is to bend the steel rods.  Find  and mark the center point of the rod, securing it to a vise then bending a 90-degree angle into the rod.  Remove from the vise and complete the bend so the rod is folded in half.  Use the vise again, if necessary to reinforce the bend.  Find the center of the bent piece, bending it again to about 45-degrees, spreading the legs out slightly wider than the plane’s fuselage.  You can work different bends which correspond to the fuselage shape.  Next, prepare the hangers for painting.  This may be accomplished by using either a sandblaster or a bench grinder with a wire wheel.  Sandpaper may also be used.  The purpose is to remove any residual oils from the metal in order to give a good surface for the paint to adhere.  A degreaser or TSP will clean up any remaining residue.  Then, spray paint the hangers, making sure to let them dry completely.  The next step is to add tubing to insulate the hanger where it contacts the wing.  Be sure the inside diameter of the tube matches the outside diameter of the rod.  This will act as a buffer between the hanger and the wing of the rc plane, advantageous for heavier planes as well as those having a delicate finish.  Hairspray and glass cleaner are good treatments for the hanger surface with hairspray acting as an adhesive as it drys.  Finally, mount the hooks in the ceiling, draping the hangers through the hooks.

Planes may also be mounted on the wall area of a garage or storage building.  If space allows, the entire aircraft may be secured with hangers draped around wall mounted hooks, as with the ceiling example.  However, if storage space is limited, the fuselage and wing components may need to be stored separately.  By using metal shelf brackets placed about two feet above the floor level supporting a wooden shelf, wings may be placed in small storage bins on the shelf.  In this mode, the wings are high enough not to be disturbed by traffic inside the area, yet low enough not to conflict with fuselage storage.  Fuselages may be hung by either the tail or propeller, with the tail preferred due to the larger surface area.  The disadvantage of tail hanging is gasoline accumulation near the engine.  Rotating fuselage positions may help in overcoming this.  Finally, if no other space is available, an appropriate rc plane makes a good decorator item for a den or rec room.

Another method of storage, which has gained favor in recent years, is the use of PVC tubing.  Its advantages are simplicity, flexibility, and a relatively low cost.  With the use of a scissors-like cutting tool, PVC tubing may be cut to any length or configuration.  While three to four-tier racks are the most popular configuration, many variations are in use.  Since PVC racks are light, they are easily transportable, allowing an rc pilot the opportunity to fly several planes at an event.  Cement is usually not necessary to secure PVC tubing, since the tubing is usually snug at the 90-degree joints.  PVC pipes may also be used with metal hangers and hooks with the PVC acting as an insulator, as well as a work stand frame for rc models.

RC model stores sell a variety of storage kits, with most priced about $50, depending upon the configuration and type of kit.  Some avid enthusiasts have even purchased outdoor buildings in which to store their planes.   With all of the possibilities, rc model storage is not a one size fits all endeavor.

 

STO#2

 

 

 

MARINE AIR

MAR#1

 

Over the past 100 years, Marine Aviation has grown in both numbers and variety of missions.  During this blog, we’ll trace the history of USMC aviation from its inception to the many roles it plays in defense of our nation today.

The beginnings of Marine Aviation date back to 1912 when First Lieutenant Alfred A. Cunningham reported for aviation duty at the Naval Aviation Camp at Annapolis, Maryland.  The camp was composed of two officers, six mechanics, and three aircraft.  Cunningham soloed on August 20. 1912 after a mere two hours and forty minutes of instruction.  During the next four years, Lts. Bernard L. Smith, William M. Mcllvain, Francis T. Evans and Roy S. Geiger were assigned to the school.  Each pilot had his own concept of how this new arm could enhance Marine Corps. operations.  This resulted in two rival concepts of Marine Aviation, one in which the sole mission of the air arm was combat support of ground forces, while the other emphasized combined operations in which Marine Aviation supported the Navy.  A training exercise in 1914 proved the value of USMC aviation.  This exercise was a test of the ability of a Marine force to occupy, fortify and defend an advanced base and hold it against hostile attack.  The air contingent was composed of two officers with ten mechanics, one flying boat and one amphibian.  As the exercise progressed, two pilots took brigade commanders on reconnaissance flights over the battle area.  The brigade officers were impressed with the speed and field of vision of the aircraft and recommended doubling the size of both the pilots and ground crew.

With the US declaration of war against Germany in 1917, Marine Aviation entered a period of rapid growth in both manpower and equipment.  The Marine Corps entered the war with 511 officers and 13,214 enlisted.  By wars end the Corps. commitment totaled 2,400 officers and 70,000 enlisted.  While the initial concept of Marine deployment to France was to send a brigade to fight alongside the Army, Marine Aviation began to assert itself to ensure that the new arm got its share of Corps. manpower, additionally providing air support for the brigade.  However, Marine Corps. Aviation found itself split between two competing missions.  Land-based planes provided artillery spotting and reconnaissance for the brigade deployed to France, as well as a seaplane unit flying antisubmarine patrols.  In addition to flying cover for ground forces, Marine Air units carried out fourteen bombing missions against railway yards, canals, and supply dumps, resulting in the destruction of four German aircraft.

After World War I ended, the Marine Corps., along with the other services, began a desperate struggle to persuade Congress to maintain prewar levels of bases, personnel, and equipment.  As a sidebar to the overall battle for military appropriations, Lt. (now Maj.) Cunningham fought for a permanent status for Marine Aviation.  He appeared before a number of military organizations, in addition to Congressional Committees.  Cunningham also wrote a number of articles emphasizing the role of aviation in future military conflicts.  As a result of his efforts and those of other military leaders, Marine Aviation had survived with Congress authorizing Marine Corps. strength at twenty percent of total Navy strength in 1920.  The Corps. found it necessary to conduct a number of well-publicized exercises in order to garner further support from both Congress and the American public.  One such exercise was conducted in 1922 in which a force of 4,000 Marines marched from Quantico, Va. to Gettysburg, Pa.  Three heavy Martin MTB bombers were assigned to support the march.  The Marine aviators flew a total of 500 hours and 40,000 air miles, carrying passengers and freight, as well as executing simulated attack missions.  Marine aviators tested both new equipment and techniques, with the first successful dive-bombing conducted in 1919.  They also made several long-distance flights, in addition to participating in a number of key air races.   Overseas deployments to the Carribean, China, and the Western Pacific in the 1930s proved the flexibility of Marine Air.

Marine Aviation experienced a phenomenal growth during World War II.  In 1936 there were only 145 Marine pilots on active duty with a gradual increase to 245 by mid-1940.  By the end of that year, it had swelled to 425, augmented by the Marine Corps. Aviation Reserve.  At the time of Pearl Harbor, Marine Aviation was composed of 13 squadrons and 204 aircraft.  By the end of the war, its strength had increased to 145 squadrons and approximately 3,000 aircraft.  To support this expansion, new bases were required in the continental United States.  New and larger bases such as Cherry Point, NC replaced the original base at Quantico Virginia, while El Toro, CA replaced the older base at San Diego on the West Coast.  The location of both bases was in close proximity to the major Marine ground bases at Camp Lejune, North Carolina and Camp Pendleton, California.  The location of these bases facilitated the doctrine of close air support of Marine ground units by Marine Aviation.  Though outnumbered, Marine pilots performed admirably in the defense of Wake Island, sinking the destroyer Kisaragi and shooting down seven Japanese aircraft.  While sustaining heavy losses at Midway, Marine aviators nevertheless played a vital role in the victory there.  They plowed their way up the Solomons from Henderson Field at Guadalcanal to Okinawa, providing dedicated ground support.  Marine aviation ended the war with 2,335 aircraft destroyed, producing 121 aces.

After World War II, Marine aviation began to emphasize operations from aircraft carriers, which actually began late in that war.  The development of the helicopter also broadened the horizons of Marine Aviation.  When the Korean War began in 1950, Marine Aviation units were alerted for combat duty.  Within six weeks, a carrier-based squadron was flying ground attack missions.  Marine air gave a good account of itself flying ground support missions for UN forces in the Pusan Perimeter, as well as providing valuable close air support for the Inchon landing from carriers and later Kimpo Airfield.  Along with the Navy and Air Force, Marine aircraft supplied the 1st Marine Division and evacuated more than 5,000 casualties during the withdrawal from the Chosin Reservoir.  By the end of the war in July 1953, Marine aircraft flew more than 118,000 sorties, of which 29,500 were close support missions.  Marine helicopter squadrons evacuated approximately 10,000 ground troops during the course of the war.

Marine Aviation was at the forefront during the Viet Nam War, and both Gulf Wars.  It has a long tradition of providing close air support and material support of ground forces.  Though its missions have changed in recent years, it remains a force of readiness for the nation.

 

MAR#3

 

ROUND AND ROUND

CIR#1

 

 

From the early days of aviation, the design of airports was a paramount issue.  From the narrow grass runways of the 1920s to the wide concrete lanes of today, airport design has come a long way.  However, a new concept of the airport may hold promise for the future-the circular airport.  During this blog, we’ll present both the advantages and disadvantages of circular runways and their future impact on aviation.

The concept of circular runways has been around for a number of years.  In 1919 a circular runway was proposed for downtown Manhattan with the idea of getting direct air access to NYC.  This would be accomplished by connecting the runway to a series of skyscrapers.  While a practical idea at the time, having an airport on top of major buildings conflicted with the architecture of the area and was only useful for light aircraft.  In 1957 the circular airport concept was first designed for jet aircraft.  Such an approach was considered because jetliners of the era required more runway than their piston-engined counterparts.  The British designer, Sir H. Temptest thought a circular or endless runway, while expensive to build, would save the cost of lengthening existing airports on a long-term basis.  By 1964, the US military expressed interest in the idea and conducted a series of tests at the General Motors Proving Grounds near Mesa, Arizona.  These tests have conducted a circular based track with a circumference of five miles and a radius of eight-tenths of a mile.  The track was forty-five feet wide and was banked from nearly zero degrees on the inside to twenty-two degrees on the outside, which corresponds to the equilibrium take off and landing speeds varying from zero knots to about one-hundred-forty knots.  Though pilots found it difficult to land with the correct roll angle on the speed circle corresponding to the landing speed.  However, pilots reported that the runway tended to correct their errors regarding landing speed, the point of touchdown and degree of bank.  Aids such as a marking on the runway helped them for positioning.  After several trials, pilots adjusted to the track and reported exceptional lateral stability with the aircraft finding it’s natural line on the runway corresponding to its speed.

While the Mesa tests were successful, it was nearly fifty years before further research was conducted on circular runways.  This was largely due to construction costs of circular runways, which require about twice the length of linear runways, as well as the precise banking of the runway.  However, interest in the concept was revived in 2011 as a result of the “Fentress Global Challenge: Airport Of The Future” study initiated by two university students, one from Standford and the other from Malaysia’s University Of Science, concurrently as the Dutch consortium NLR began to research the feasibility of circular runways.  Both studies indicated a number of advantages associated with circular runways.  The first advantage is both a safety and fuel consideration.  Since the runway is a circle, an aircraft may both take off and land in a direction which avoids the effects of crosswinds, enabling a safe landing or takeoff.  The aircraft also saves fuel in the process, as well having fewer emissions to the environment.  Circular runways allow air controllers to control takeoffs and landings at any point along the circle, thus reducing noise pollution.  Circular runways can handle the same number of departures or arrivals as straight runways.  While the runway length is about twice that of a straight runway, the airport as a whole takes about one-third the space of a linear airport.  Construction costs have also decreased in recent years, with the cost of a circular airport at about 1.5 times the cost of a straight airport.  Also, by having less total space than a linear airport, circular airports are more adaptable to smaller communities.  However, circular runways have a few disadvantages.  Perhaps the most difficult aspect of operating from a circular runway will be landing on a banked runway since the weight of the wings is not shared equally and could damage the plane’s tires due to unequal stress.  Landing from a corner will also be difficult and pilots will need training specific to circular runways.

Circular runways are feasible with current technology and construction techniques.  Today’s aircraft characteristics allow takeoffs and landings with both speeds and low altitude bank angles compatible with operation on a circular track.  The circular runway accommodates intermodal transport, in addition to improved operations planning and navigation equipment.  Perhaps the greatest obstacle to circular runways is that of public acceptance.

 

FLY ‘EM BIG

BIG#1

 

To view a large-scale model in flight is an impressive experience.  These rc planes have a number of features, such as flaps, sliding canopies and landing lights, which convey the impression of a real aircraft.  However, the complexity of these models poses a problem for the rc pilot.  During this blog, we’ll examine some of the problems associated with flying a large rc model.

The first issue of flying a large rc plane is a reliable power source.  While lipo (lithium polymer) batteries now offer near gasoline power in some applications, gasoline engines remain the best choice to provide sustained power over a long flight.  Speaking of fuel, carefully check all fuel lines and make sure they are properly connected.  Make sure you have the correct diameter and type of line for the fuel you are using.  All of the rc’s fuel should be filtered, with periodic filter changes advisable.  A number of models now have a filter in the filing line, as well as one between the carburetor and the fuel tank.  If the rc pilot is using glow fuel or gasoline, he may use either, but not both as they are not interchangeable.  The rc pilot should also make sure the fuel tank clunk stays free from the front of the tank and does not bend, which could obstruct the flow of fuel, producing a rough take off.

Flight control surfaces are an important component, as well.  The rc operator must make sure all control linkages are both properly secured and pivot according to transmitter commands.  Ailerons, elevators, and rudders should have equal parameters of movement in each direction.  This is especially true of flaps, which aid in landing and flight stability at low speeds.  Flap hinges should work freely, without binding.  Servo mounts also pose a problem, as they tend to work loose after repeated flights.  Check them after each flight to ensure they are secure and functioning.  Engine mounts and mufflers are also prone to vibration.  Carefully balancing the props will help, but vibrations are an inherent problem with large rc models.  Replace propeller blades when necessary to keep the aircraft running smoothly, since they cost a fraction of replacing an entire plane.

Range checks are essential to gauge whether a radio signal allows the plane to fly at a safe distance without it going out of radio range.  To conduct a range check, first turn on the transmitter, then the receiver and fully retract the antenna.  Activate the transmitter while walking back from the plane between seventy-five and one-hundred feet.  As you walk away from the plane, keep moving the control surface sticks and closely watch the various control surfaces of the plane.  If you experience a hesitation or a lack of movement of the control surfaces, do not attempt to fly the aircraft.  Check the transmitter batteries, as they may need recharging or replacing, since low batteries may drastically reduce radio range.  Loose connections to the receiver could also cause a lack of response from control surfaces.  If control surfaces are still unresponsive, there may be signal interference from other rc hobbyists on your frequency.  Interference is a leading cause of rc aircraft crashes, so you need to be sure your frequency is clear before taking off.  Whatever the cause, if your rc plane appears difficult to control, correct the problem before flying.

Though not always practiced, test glides of the aircraft are advisable, particularly if the rc model is a powered glider or a large aircraft.  The reason for doing this to determine the glide pattern of the plane, should it suddenly lose power.  A test glide is best conducted over long grass if possible.  This is necessary to ensure a soft landing for the plane should there be turbulence.  Test glides may also be used to confirm the balance of the plane with regard to weight distribution and center of gravity.  Always take off and land in a flat, level area if possible.  Finally, have fun but use common sense; avoid flying too close to people or property yet keeping the plane at a sensible height and distance while maintaining control, as well as keeping an eye out for other rc pilots.

 

BIG#2

 

 

 

SAVED BY THE SABRE

F-86#1

 

In late 1950, as USAF B-29s were bombing North Korean supply lines in support of UN ground troops, they encountered a swept-winged North Korean aircraft capable of great speed.  While the introduction of the MIG-15 caught United Nations forces by surprise, its counterpart would prove to be a legend among jet fighter aircraft.

As early as 1944, North American Aviation had proposed a jet aircraft design to the US Navy, as a result of combat against the early German jet fighters, such as the ME-262.  This design, the FJ-1 Fury was, in essence, a jet version of the P-51 MUSTANG.  Though its speed was impressive compared to piston-powered fighters, its overall performance failed to meet expectations.  However, within a few months, the USAAF approached North American with a requirement for a medium-range, single-seat, high-altitude, jet-powered day escort fighter/fighter-bomber.  In early 1945, North American submitted four designs to the Air Corps with North American granted permission to produce three examples of the XP-86 (Experimental Pursuit) aircraft.  While the XP-86 was a lighter plane than the Fury, and could attain 582 mph, as opposed to 547 for the FJ-1, the XP-86 could not meet the Air Corps requirement for a top speed of 600 mph.  Furthermore, two rival designs, the XP-80 and XP-84 having speeds in the range of the XP-86 were already under development and might result in cancellation of the contract for the XP-86.

North American was able to solve this problem with a leapfrog in technology.  The XP-86 was the first American aircraft to take advantage of captured German test data at the end of World War II, which indicated a thin swept wing could greatly reduce drag and delay compressibility problems when an aircraft approached the speed of sound.  Further study of the tests revealed a swept wing would solve the speed problem, while a slat on the wing’s leading edge would enhance low-speed stability.  Since the 86 was approaching an advanced stage of development, North American’s senior management was hesitant to incorporate a swept wing design.  However, after a series of wind tunnel tests, a 35-degree sweep offered the best performance with automatic front slats and an electrically adjusted stabilizer based on the ME-262.  As a result of combat experience gained in Korea, the front edge wing slats were phased out in favor of a leading edge chord extending 6 inches from the wing root to 3 inches at the tip.

Though much of the design work was delayed until after the end of World War II, the first F-86 SABRE was completed on August 8, 1947, with the first flight occurring on October 1 of that year.  The SABRE was first assigned to the USAF Strategic Air Command in 1949 prior to its deployment to Korea in late 1950.  The F-86 set a number of speed records during its early years, an official world speed record of 671 mph in September 1948, a 1951Bendix Trophy for an average speed of 553.76 mph, as well as the first woman, Jacqueline Cochran, to break the speed of sound in May 1953.

When the Soviet MIG-15 was introduced in November 1950, it outperformed all UN aircraft, such as the straight-winged F-80 and F-84.  The MIG was clearly a generation ahead of both types, as well as the F9F PANTHER, flown by the US Navy from carriers offshore.  Three squadrons of F-86s were dispatched to the Far East in December 1950.  Though the F-86 and the MIG-15 were evenly matched and based on similar design concepts, there were a number of differences.  SABRES were more aerodynamically stable and could turn, roll and dive faster than the MIG.  The F-86 could also go supersonic in a dive, while the MIG would experience structural damage attempting to do so.  The SABRE was also equipped with a radar gunsight, which allowed pilots to quickly aim their .50 caliber guns more accurately-even compensating for speed.  The MIG-15s key advantages were faster climbing and acceleration rates, effective handling at high altitudes and being somewhat more maneuverable.  Firepower between the two aircraft was a tradeoff, with the SABRE firing more smaller rounds more accurately aimed and the MIG firing less accurate but larger bore (23mm and 37mm) ammunition.  Perhaps the deciding factor in the air war over Korea was the quality of pilots.  Many of the MIGs were flown by Soviet pilots for about the first year of their deployment.  Many of these were aces from World War II and were thus capable pilots.  The USAF followed the same philosophy, sending a number of World War II aces to Korea as well.  While the Soviet pilots were well trained, the USAF training program at Nellis AFB was both more broad and intense.  As Soviet pilots were rotated home, they were replaced by less capable Chinese and North Korean pilots.  As the war progressed, this was reflected in the loss ratio between the two aircraft.  While the overall loss ratio was in favor of the SABRE of about eight to one by wars end (78 to 687), the loss ratio against Soviet pilots has been disputed in recent years, with a number of former Soviet pilots stating a loss ratio of two to one in favor of the SABRE.  The most hotly contested battles were fought over an area near the mouth of the Yalu River known as MIG ALLEY.

After the Korean War, the SABRE was exported to a number of nations to include NATO allies such as the United Kingdom, Canada, West Germany, Greece, Spain, Norway and Turkey, as well as Taiwan, Japan, Pakistan and Saudi Arabia.  The last SABRE was retired from the Bolivian Air Force in 1994.  Though the SABRE was in service for many years, the high point of its career was in Korea-in which a few brave pilots and planes made the difference in saving a nation.

 

F-86#2

 

 

SAFETY FIRST

SEC#1

 

Tragic as the events of September 11, 2001, were, they forced a needed examination of global aviation security.  In this blog, we’ll look at both current problems and approaches to enhance the security of global air travel.

Since the 1970s, trade, technology, and economic growth have merged to form a state of globalization, in which the welfare of people, firms, and nations have become ever more interconnected.  Concurrently, civil aviation has evolved from a heavily regulated system of government-sponsored air services and airports to an increasingly competitive global structure, in which private organizations compete with their publicly held counterparts.  Global air traffic has increased exponentially over the last forty-five years, in spite of economic recessions, military conflicts, health epidemics and acts of terror.  Due to the nature of its operations, civil aviation has always been a target for violent acts.  The first violent incidents involving civil airliners were hijack attempts, which began in the 1960s.  By the late 1970s, these were on the decline due to international treaties and plain-clothed security personnel on board the aircraft.  During the 1980s bomb attacks designed to draw attention were on the rise, decreasing in later decades.  By the 1990s, aviation security had evolved into a complex system combining intelligence agencies and airport security personnel coupled with electronic devices from which to detect, bombs, weapons and prohibited items.

The terror attacks of September 11, 2001 were the most graphic example of the ever-evolving threat of terror attacks against aviation.  The attacks demonstrated how civil aircraft could be used as weapons to kill large numbers of civilians and destroy assets on the ground.  Since that time governments have created a number of new organizations to direct airport security systems, as well as massive investments in both technology and personnel.  Though both airlines and airports have faced challenges resulting from heightened security efforts, the traveling public has been willing to bear them to promote a secure travel environment.

Today, there are several factors affecting the security of global aviation.  Technology is rapidly enabling the ability of terror groups and other bad players to inflict large-scale damage.  While the capability for such efforts has been confined to a few major nations, such technology is now available to a number of non-state organizations.  The merging of cyber and physical capabilities are creating new security issues.  One only need to see a virtual reality game to understand how closely simulations can approximate real-world situations.  Many systems in civil aviation such as traffic management systems, passport control system, departure control systems, hazardous materials transport and reservation systems are all vulnerable to outside hacking.  Computerized aircraft flight systems pose an equally serious threat.  GPS navigation systems, fuel control systems, flight control and maintenance only serve to increase the points of cyber vulnerability.  As aviation becomes more computerized, human proficiency becomes less effective.  Though automated systems are becoming more flexible to handle a variety of situations, minimizing human involvement.  However, when humans have less opportunity to practice and develop skills, they become less capable of acting in a timely and appropriate manner when emergencies arise.  Perhaps the most vulnerable points in many automated systems are those in which humans interact with automated programs.

However, a number of solutions are available to enhance global flight security.  There is currently too much emphasis on molding new problems into existing regulations.  As is often the case, by the time new policies are formulated, a new threat has arisen.  Global aviation firms should adopt a philosophy of thinking like the terrorist, rather than relying upon yesterday’s doctrine to meet future attacks.  In the realm of cybersecurity, firms must enhance their understanding of threats by testing their systems by in-house or outside consultants, tailoring their systems to meet the threats.  Firms should cooperate on both cyber and physical security threats, as cooperation makes everyone stronger.  Any would be hacker will always probe for the weakest link.  Real and potential vulnerabilities should be shared between companies.  Finally, airlines need to rethink border security, in the digital sense.  While the number of remote attacks has increased in recent years, air safety is improved by a thorough knowledge of passengers – an area in which more capable programs are needed.

Civil aviation is a key element of the global economy and any event, whether accidental or intentional, has a direct bearing on the media.  With new technology promoting the rapid transfer of information, it will continue to be a likely target for those who want to cause maximum disruption.

 

SEC#2

 

 

 

 

 

RCS & RADIOS

RADIO#1

 

While the operation of radio control models as a hobby is a relatively recent event, the technology behind the hobby dates back to the nineteenth century.  During the course of this blog, we’ll trace the evolution of rc model transmitters and their applications.

The first use of radio control technology dates back to 1898, when Nikola Tesla built a pair of radio controlled boats, demonstrating them to a shocked crowd at Madison Square Garden.  Though only able to cruise a short distance, the boats showed the potential of radio control.  During World War I, Archibald Low designs an aerial drone plane for the Royal Flying Corps for use as a radio-controlled guided bomb.  By the 1930s practical rc planes were available to hobbyists, with Walter and William Good building and flying the first fully-functional rc aircraft in 1937.  As a result of progress in radio control technology during World War II, the use of rc models increased dramatically during the 1950s, though the battery capacities were limited and needed frequent rechargings until transistors became available.

Transistors also reduced the voltage requirements of a battery, virtually eliminating the older high voltage batteries.  One channel rc radio kits were introduced in the 1950s with preassembled units offered later.  In both tube and transistor radios of the era, the rc planes control functions were operated by an electromagnetic escapement utilizing a rubber- band loop system from which the rc pilot could control rudder and speed functions.  By the 1960s, crystal-controlled superheterodyne receivers became available.  These offered a true three-dimensional control of rc aircraft (yaw, pitch and motor speed).  Heterodyne receivers also provided a more sensitive signal selection coupled with a more stable rc model control.  After World War II commercial rc planes control signals were limited to two or three channels using amplitude modulation.  More channel choices were added in the 1960s using frequency modulation, which offered twenty or more operating channels.

The next generation of rc model transmitters was developed in the mid-1970s.  A Pulse Width Modulation (PWM) Signal is a method by which an analog signal is produced using a digital source.  PWM signals consist of two primary components that define its behavior: a duty cycle and a frequency.  The duty cycle is the amount of time the signal is in a high (on) state as a percentage of the total time it takes to complete one cycle.  The frequency determines how fast the PWM completes a cycle, and consequently how fast it switches between high and low states.  By cycling a digital signal on and off at a fast enough rate, and with a certain duty cycle, the output will appear to behave like a constant voltage analog signal when providing power to devices.  These signals transmitted in a rapid succession could control multiple functions on the rc model.

On the heels of PWM signal technology Pulse Code Modulation (PCM) was developed.  While analog technology uses continuous signals, digital technology encodes the information into discrete signal states.  With two states assigned per digital signal, they are called binary signals, while a single binary digit is termed a bit.  While PCM is an efficient means of signal transmission, it is by no means foolproof due to the proliferation of radio control devices in both the hobby and industrial markets.  To overcome this problem, some late model FM receivers which still use PWM coding can be modified by the use of advanced computer chips to detect the individual signal characteristics of a particular Pulse Width Modulation without needing a designated code, as required with PCM coding.

By the early 2000s, Spread Spectrum rc contol systems came into use.  A Spread Spectrum rc control system uses a variable frequency of operation, usually in the 2.4 gigahertz band, in which the rc transmitter stays on a given frequency for a minimal amount of time.  With the enhanced security offered by Spread Spectrum systems, an increasing number of radio manufacturers are offering the units to hobbyists at a price from $3,000 to as low as $30.  A number of manufacturers are now selling conversion kits for older digital 72 MHz radios and receivers, providing even more options for the rc model operator.

 

RADIO#2

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

THE CONNIE

CON#1

 

In 1939 Trans World Airlines was becoming a major competitor with Pan American Airlines for the emerging overseas route service.  While TWA contracted with Lockheed to develop an aircraft to rival the performance and capacity of the Boeing Stratoliner, a major stockholder of TWA requested Lockheed to build an even greater plane-one which would ultimately define both an airline and an era of aviation.

Though Lockheed had been working on the L-044 Excalibur since 1937, Howard Hughes, the majority stockholder of Trans World, requested Lockheed develop an even more capable aircraft with a forty passenger capacity and a range of 3,500 miles.  The new design, the L-049 Constellation, was a radical departure from previous airliners.  The tripletail configuration kept the aircraft’s height low enough to fit in existing hangars.  The wing layout was similar to another Lockheed plane, the P-38 Lightning.  The L-049 featured such innovations as hydraulically boosted controls and a de-icing system used on wing and tail surfaces and mounted tricycle landing gear.  The Constellation had an impressive performance for its day, being able to attain a maximum speed of 375 mph. with a cruising speed of 340 mph. – faster than many fighters of the era, with a service ceiling of 24,000 ft.

While intended for use as an airliner, the L-049s which entered service for TWA in January 1943 were quickly converted to military transports with the USAAF ordering 202 aircraft.  The military designation, C-69, was used primarily as a long-range troop transport.  Though the C-69 was successful in its role, only 22 aircraft were produced during the war.  A number remained in service with the USAF into the 1960s, ferrying relocating military personnel.  Lockheed even had plans to develop the L-049 as a long-range bomber (XB-30), but the design was never pursued.

 

CON#2

 

Following World War II the Constellation began its heyday.  USAAF C-69 transports were completed as civil airliners with TWA accepting its first aircraft in October 1945, initiating its first transatlantic flight from Washington DC to Paris in December of that year.  During the late 1940s, the Constellation was upgraded several times to increase fuel capacity and speed.  Finally, in early 1951 the Super Constellation was introduced.  The Super Connie was extended 18.4 ft. over the L-1049 (L-049).  to expand passenger capacity to ninety- two seats with a cruising speed of 305 mph. and a range of 5,150 miles.  With auxiliary wing-tip fuel tanks, the Super Constellation could fly non-stop between New York and Los Angeles.  Some pilots used to shorter runs began to complain about long days.  An early problem with the 1049 Model was excessive exhaust gas flaming-sometimes past the trailing wing edge.  Once the exhaust problem was corrected, the Super Connie became a highly successful airliner.

In 1955 the Constellation underwent additional updates.  Though still called the Super Constellation, the Model 1649 aircraft was first designated the Super Star Constellation, finally evolving into the Starliner name by Lockheed.  The Starliner was the most extensive modification of any Constellation models.  The Starliner had features such as fully reclining seats for long flights, a more precise cabin temperature control, and ventilation, as well as state of the art noise insulation.  The Starliner had outside improvements which included a longer and narrower wing, nearly doubling the capacity of the original Connie with twice the range at maximum payload-enabling it to reach any major European air hub non-stop from US airports.  The Model 1649 also has the distinction of being the fastest piston-engined airliner flown at ranges of over 4,000 miles.

The Constellation served a number of military roles, in addition to a troop transport.  In 1948 the USAF placed an order for ten Constellation transport aircraft (C-121).  Several of these were deployed in support of the Berlin Airlift later that year.  Six of the planes were later reconfigured to VIP transports (VC-121), one of which was used by Dwight Eisenhower as NATO Chief Of Staff.  Eisenhower was so impressed with the plane, he named it Columbine.  When he became President he was assigned another VC-121, which he named Columbine II.  In the early 1950s, the US Navy, Air Force, and Marine Corps ordered C-121s mounted with radar domes on top to provide long-range radar for surface ships, as well as surveillance radar for command and control of aircraft.  In the early 1960s, EC-121s briefly performed an anti-submarine role for the US Navy.

By the end of the 1950s, the Constellation became an aviation icon.  It was in service with more than a dozen airlines, quickly becoming the flagship of Trans World Airlines.  The Connie was in service with both the US military and several other government agencies, with duties ranging from tracking smugglers to hurricanes.  Though expensive to build due to its tapered fuselage, the Constellation was a graceful aircraft.  While being rapidly phased out by the major airlines in 1961 in favor of newer jetliners such as the Boeing 707 and Douglas DC-8, the Connie was still in use with a number of regional airlines with 856 examples built.  Howard Hughes gamble in 1939 had paid off in a big way.

 

FLY ‘EM SAFE

DRONE#A

 

Though flying an rc model can be a fun activity, certain safety considerations must be observed in order to make the flight both a safe and enjoyable experience.  During this blog, we’ll take a look at buying an rc plane or helicopter from the safety standpoint, as well as techniques to promote safe flying.

Real aircraft must undergo a pre-flight checklist, which is also a good philosophy for radio control aircraft.   The pilot must make sure the rudder, ailerons, and elevators are functioning properly, with both the receiver battery and radio fully charged. The problem with rc planes, as opposed to rc helicopters, is the center of gravity. The center of gravity is a point at which the plane needs to balance in order to fly well.  The center of gravity for a plane with a tail can be as far back as 32% from the nose of the plane of the plane, though the operator may still have to make it balance.  While placement of the battery and radio can compensate for any CG imbalance, it’s always desirable to have both a light nose and tail section of the aircraft, with adjustments made at the center of the fuselage.  A properly balanced plane will be more responsive to commands and use less fuel/battery charge.  Flying wing designs have a common center of gravity at 23% back from the nose.

Before launching the plane, be sure the correct propellers are installed.  The thickest section of the prop should be facing toward the front,  The rc pilot can determine the front of the blade by manufacturer lettering.  The plane will still fly with the prop(s) mounted backward, though at about a third of the power of a front mounted blade since the thicker front section displaces more air.  Better quality props are more rigid, and thus more stable in flight – especially at high rpms.  They are also less likely to flatten out over extended use.  Getting a good launch of the aircraft is more difficult than it appears.  Inexperienced rc pilots have a tendency to spin the plane, often a cause of crashes.  If one wingtip is moving faster than the other, it will have more air over the wing, so the plane will roll towards the slower wing.  The correct procedure is to release the plane when both wings are level and moving in the same direction at the same speed.  If the model is launched at too steep an angle, it will experience an immediate stall.

Transmitters are an important element of rc flight.  Many rc pilots have a tendency to fly their planes by their thumbs.  Clutch the transmitter sticks on the side with the elevons or elevator-ailerons control.  This offers the rc pilot more than one orientation to the controls and prevents accidental maneuvers of the rc plane.  Don’t jerk the control sticks, but rather use a gradual motion from which to control the model.  Proper antenna angle is another factor, since there may be local interference, which affects signal quality.  Fly the plane at a close distance, using different antenna angles to determine the optimum signal.  While more recent rc planes are equipped with a homing device, which returns the plane to the transmitter if the model experiences signal or line of sight interference, it’s always best to fly your rc plane no farther than your field of view.  A three channel transmitter with throttle, rudder and elevator controls is usually the best for a beginner.  Speaking of planes, the most important decision facing beginning rc pilots is choice of aircraft.  The hard fact is the plane will experience a number of crashes until the pilot becomes more proficient. Foam is a relatively inexpensive material and easy to repair if the rc plane is damaged. While a foam aircraft construction is not the most pleasing to the eye, it provides the rc model beginner with a practical means of getting into the air. RC models may be purchased in either ready to fly (RTF) or in kit form, which must be assembled.  Building your own model has the advantages of learning the parts and operating systems of the plane, as well as a lower cost.  RC model planes may be powered by either gasoline engines or lithium polymer (LIPO) batteries.  The use of lipo batteries has increased drastically in radio control use over the last ten years.  They offer near gasoline engine performance while being more compact, with little or no maintenance.

The use of radio control aircraft, quadcopters and drones have increased exponentially over the last fifteen years.  Near collisions between drones and passenger aircraft now run into the hundreds each year, with the FAA receiving in excess of 100 reports per month.  While most drones weigh less than ten pounds and have a limited altitude, heavier and more capable machines are the rise.  For example, even a collision between a lightweight drone and a jetliner could result in millions of dollars if the jetliner sustained damage to either the engine or control surfaces.  Though the FAA has a regulation in effect for four years making it illegal to fly a drone within five miles of an airport and limiting the altitude to 400 ft., many operators who use drones in their business pay scant attention.  A year later the FAA enacted a five dollar registration fee for all drones weighing more than half a pound.  While ineffective at tracking drones, it may get the attention of some operators.  For all the electronics and regulations, perhaps the best source of rc model safety is common sense in their use.

 

CSH#2